Alexander S. Kauffman
University of California, San Diego
NeuropeptideCircadian rhythmInternal medicineEndocrinologyNeuroscienceReceptorKisspeptinHypothalamusEstrogenLuteinizing hormoneGonadotropinGonadotropin-releasing hormoneSex characteristicsAnteroventral periventricular nucleusSex steroidPhodopusNeurokinin BSexual differentiationHormoneBiology
95Publications
37H-index
3,883Citations
Publications 93
Newest
#1Eulalia A Coutinho (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 1
#2Lourdes A. Esparza (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 7
Last. Alexander S. Kauffman (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 37
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Shannon B. Z. Stephens (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 10
#2Alexander S. Kauffman (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 37
In females, ovarian estradiol (E2) exerts both negative and positive feedback regulation on the neural circuits governing reproductive hormone secretion, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this remain poorly understood. In rodents, ERα-expressing kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic anteroventral periventricular region (AVPV) are prime candidates to mediate E2 positive feedback induction of preovulatory GnRH and LH surges. E2 stimulates AVPV Kiss1 expression, but the full ext...
Source
#1Lourdes A. Esparza (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 7
#1Lourdes A Esparza (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 3
Last. Alexander S. Kauffman (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 37
view all 4 authors...
Androgens can affect the reproductive axis of both sexes. In healthy women, as in men, elevated exogenous androgens decrease gonad function and lower gonadotropin levels; such circumstances occur with anabolic steroid abuse or in transgender men (genetic XX individuals) taking androgen supplements. The neuroendocrine mechanisms by which endogenous or exogenous androgens regulate gonadotropin release, including aspects of pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, remain unknown. Because anima...
Source
#1Dequina A. Nicholas (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 11
#2Vashti S. Knight (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 1
Last. Mark A. Lawson (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 25
view all 10 authors...
The mechanisms mediating suppression of reproduction in response to decreased nutrient availability remain undefined, with studies suggesting regulation occurs within the hypothalamus, pituitary, or gonads. By manipulating glucose utilization and GLUT1 expression in a pituitary gonadotrope cell model and in primary gonadotropes, we show GLUT1-dependent stimulation of glycolysis, but not mitochondrial respiration, by the reproductive neuropeptide GnRH. GnRH stimulation increases gonadotrope GLUT1...
Source
#1Lourdes A. Esparza (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 7
#1Lourdes A Esparza (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 3
Last. Alexander S. Kauffman (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 37
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Eulalia A Coutinho (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 1
#2Lourdes A. Esparza (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 7
Last. Alexander S. Kauffman (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 37
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Dequina A. Nicholas (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 11
#2Vashti S. KnightH-Index: 1
Last. Mark A. Lawson (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 25
view all 10 authors...
Source
#1Alexander S. Kauffman (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 37
#2Hanne M. Hoffmann (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 10
Abstract Many physiological systems rely on hormones to communicate and time cellular and tissue-level functions. Most endocrine systems are dynamic and governed by complex regulatory systems and/or feedback mechanisms to generate precise patterns and modes of hormone release in order to optimize control of physiological and cellular processes. This Special Issue focuses on hormone release patterns (ultradian, infradian, pulsatile, circadian), with a special emphasis on the hypothalamic-pituitar...
1 CitationsSource
#1Lourdes A. Esparza (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 7
#1Lourdes A Esparza (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 3
Last. Alexander S. Kauffman (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 37
view all 5 authors...
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common reproductive disorder in women, is characterized by hyperandrogenemia, chronic anovulation, cystic ovarian follicles, and luteinizing hormone (LH) hyper-pulsatility, but the pathophysiology isn't completely understood. We recently reported a novel mouse model of PCOS using chronic letrozole (LET; aromatase inhibitor). Letrozole-treated females demonstrate multiple PCOS-like phenotypes, including polycystic ovaries, anovulation, and elevated circulating ...
8 CitationsSource
#1Kristen P. Tolson (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 12
#2Nuha Marooki (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 4
Last. Alexander S. Kauffman (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 37
view all 11 authors...
The peptide kisspeptin and its receptor, Kiss1r, act centrally to stimulate reproduction. Evidence indicates that kisspeptin signaling is also important for body weight (BW) and metabolism. We recently reported that Kiss1r KO mice develop obesity, along with reduced metabolism and energy expenditure, independent of estradiol levels. Outside the brain, Kiss1r is expressed in several metabolic tissues, including brown adipose tissue (BAT), but it is unknown which specific tissue is responsible for...
8 CitationsSource