Caroline Tynan
University of Nottingham
AdvertisingAttachment theoryConsumption (economics)SociologyBusinessPsychologyMarketingPolitical scienceMarketing managementPerspective (graphical)Consumer behaviourMetaphorContext (language use)Return on marketing investmentPublic relationsMarketing researchRelationship marketingSocial psychologyMarketing strategyMarketing mix
49Publications
16H-index
1,656Citations
Publications 50
Newest
#1H.P. Samanthika Gallage (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 1
#2Teresa Heath (University of Minho)H-Index: 5
Last. Caroline Tynan (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 16
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This paper draws on theories of identity to examine challenges that former excessive drinkers experience in adopting and maintaining responsible drinking. Narratives were collected using in-depth i...
1 CitationsSource
#1Iain A. DaviesH-Index: 20
#2Caroline Oates (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 18
Last. Victoria K. WellsH-Index: 13
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Purpose: Seeking ways towards a sustainable future is the most dominant socio-political challenge of our time. Marketing should have a crucial role to play in leading research and impact in sustainability, yet it is limited by relying on cognitive behavioural theories rooted in the 1970s, which have proved to have little bearing on actual behaviour. This paper interrogates why marketing is failing to address the challenge of sustainability, and identifies alternative approaches. Design/methodolo...
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#1Ines Branco-IllodoH-Index: 2
#2Teresa HeathH-Index: 5
Last. Caroline TynanH-Index: 16
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This paper aims to examine coping approaches used by receivers to deal with failed gift experiences, thereby dealing with misperceptions between givers and receivers that could affect their relationship.,This study uses a sequential, multimethod methodology using background questionnaires, online diary method and 27 semi-structured interviews.,Receivers cope with failed gift experiences through concealing, disclosing or re-evaluating the gift experience. These approaches encompass several coping...
1 CitationsSource
#1Teresa Heath (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 5
#2Lisa O'Malley (UL: University of Limerick)H-Index: 21
Last. Caroline Tynan (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 16
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This article discusses the use of the moral philosophy known as the ethics of care to critically engage management students in ways that favour the development and enactment of a critical and respo...
2 CitationsSource
#1Sheila Malone (Lancaster University)H-Index: 3
#2Sally McKechnie (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 17
Last. Caroline Tynan (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 16
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Research on customer value creation in a tourism setting has tended to prioritize the firm’s over the customer’s perspective. However, new understandings of customer value through the lens of customer-dominant logic emphasize the need to consider value as emerging within the broader context of a customer’s lifeworld, which transcends customer–firm interactions and includes interactions with others. Tourism experiences are experiential and meaning-laden at the individual and collective levels. As...
31 CitationsSource
#1H.P. Samanthika Gallage (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 1
#2Caroline Tynan (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 16
Last. Teresa Heath (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 5
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Recent studies of alcohol consumption among students have consistently linked in-group influence with excessive drinking. Concurrently, these studies have largely overlooked the influence of non-alcohol-consuming peers (the out-group) on the in-group's decisions to consume alcohol. However, out-groups can have a significant impact on in-group members' decisions regarding publicly consumed products (White, Simpson, & Argo, 2014), such as is the case of alcohol. In light of this, our study aims to...
4 CitationsSource
#2Teresa HeathH-Index: 5
Last. Caroline TynanH-Index: 16
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This study explores emotions experienced by consumers who give up excessive drinking and considers how these emotions help consumers to sustain their healthy consumption behaviours. Current studies mostly focus on changing risky consumption behaviours (excessive drinking, smoking and gambling), rather than sustaining the positive behavioural change, which is a key challenge for consumers (Peattie and Peattie 2009; Scammon et al. 2011). Negative emotional appeals such as guilt and fear have been ...
1 Citations
#2Caroline TynanH-Index: 16
Last. Teresa HeathH-Index: 5
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This paper contributes insights for alcohol warning labels by contextualizing drinking as a part of consumers’ broader life activities. Drawing on Schramm’s Communication Theory (1954) which emphasises the necessity of sender and receiver sharing a common field of experience, we argue that effective alcohol warning labels should reflect drinkers’ life contexts. Data were collected using both narrative interviews and diaries from 25 selfreported ex-binge/excessive drinkers aged 18-38, who changed...
#1Ines Branco-Illodo (NTU: Nottingham Trent University)H-Index: 2
#2Teresa Heath (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 5
Last. Caroline Tynan (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 16
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This research sheds light on givers’ relationships with recipients by identifying the dimensions that characterise receivers as part of a dynamic gift-giving network. For this, we draw on attachment theory, which conceptualises humans’ propensity to form affectional bonds with particular others (Bowlby 1977). Understanding how givers characterise gift recipients is of great importance given the economic significance of gift giving in the UK, representing an expenditure of £40 billion p.a. (Minte...
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#1Ines Branco-Illodo (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 2
#2Teresa Heath (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 5
Last. Caroline Tynan (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
This chapter illuminates the complexity of dyadic gift-giving by identifying new forms of dyadic gift-giving and their links to givers’ relationship-maintenance goals. For this, we employ Attachment Theory which addresses humans’ need to be close to significant others (Bowlby 1969). Gift-giving is often identified as a mechanism to manage important but insecure relationships (Caplow 1982), which occurs within significant interpersonal relationships (Ruth 1996). Considering this, and that the UK ...
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