Joshua M. Liao
University of Washington
SurgeryBusinessPaymentPsychologyNursingHealth careActuarial scienceEmergency medicineOperations managementMedicaidJoint replacementMEDLINEQuality (business)Accountable careBundled paymentsHealth policyMedical educationFamily medicineMedical emergencyQuality managementMedicine
118Publications
13H-index
651Citations
Publications 124
Newest
#1Joshua M. Liao (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 13
#2Lingmei Zhou (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 1
Last. Amol S. Navathe (Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics)H-Index: 16
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#1Amol S. Navathe (Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics)H-Index: 16
#2Joshua M. Liao (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 13
Last. Rebecca S. Pepe (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 2
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#1Irene Y. Zhang (UW: University of Washington)
#2Joshua M. Liao (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 13
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#1Irene Y. Zhang (UW: University of Washington)
#2Joshua M. Liao (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 13
Health and emotions are inexorably connected. Yet there is still little emphasis on emotions in many clinical decision-making tools and interventions. Instead, existing solutions have tended to target cognition - how people comprehend and act on information about health and disease. While clear thinking contributes to better choices, a potential consequence of heavily targeting cognition is an under-emphasis on emotions - a tendency to work on improving how people think about health care choices...
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#1Sara L. Jackson (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 16
#2Hannah Shucard (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 3
Last. Patricia Fitzgerald (BIDMC: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)H-Index: 5
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Abstract null null Background null Care partners are key members of patients’ health care teams, yet little is known about their experiences accessing patient information via electronic portals. null null null Objective null To better understand the characteristics and perceptions of care partners who read patients’ electronic visit notes. null null null Patient involvement null Focus groups with diverse patients from a community health center provided input into survey development. null null nu...
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#1Amol S. Navathe (Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics)H-Index: 16
#2Joshua M. Liao (Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics)H-Index: 13
Last. Rachel M. Werner (Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics)H-Index: 41
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Importance null It is unknown how outcomes are affected when patients receive care under bundled payment and accountable care organization (ACO) programs simultaneously. null Objective null To evaluate whether outcomes in the Medicare Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) program differed depending on whether patients were attributed to ACOs in the Medicare Shared Savings Program. null Design, Setting, and Participants null This cohort study was conducted using Medicare claims data from J...
1 CitationsSource
#1Joshua M. Liao (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 13
#2Atul Gupta (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 6
Last. Amol S. Navathe (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 16
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#1Joshua M. Liao (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 13
Last. Amol S. NavatheH-Index: 16
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Building organizational capacity is critical for hospitals participating in payment models such as bundled payments and accountable care organizations, particularly "co-participant" hospitals with experience in both models. This study used a national survey of American Hospital Association member hospitals with bundled payment experience, with (co-participant hospitals) or without (bundled payment hospitals) accountable care organization experience. Questions examined capacity in 4 domains: perf...
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#1Joshua M. Liao (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 13
#2Erkuan WangH-Index: 3
Last. Amol S. NavatheH-Index: 16
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Among hospitals accepting bundled payments, simultaneous "co-participation" in accountable care organizations (ACOs) could impact episode outcomes compared to bundled payment participation alone. Difference-in-differences (DID) analysis of 1 857 653 ACO-attributed Medicare beneficiaries. The study exposure was hospitalization for 24 procedure-based and 24 condition-based episodes at hospitals participating in bundled payments and ACOs (co-participant) versus only bundled payments. Study outcomes...
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#1Joshua M. Liao (Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics)H-Index: 13
#2Risa Lavizzo-Mourey (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 29
Last. Amol S. Navathe (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 16
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1 CitationsSource