Deborah A. Small
University of Pennsylvania
WelfareAdvertisingFeelingAttributionBusinessPsychologyProsocial behaviorEconomicsRisk perceptionCognitive psychologyNegotiationConsumer behaviourControl (management)DonationPriming (media)Value (ethics)SympathyAngerSadnessGenerosityAltruism (biology)Open dataPoison controlNormativeAltruismSocial psychology
76Publications
30H-index
5,589Citations
Publications 69
Newest
#1Ike Silver (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 3
#2Brooke Kelly (Association of American Medical Colleges)
Last. Deborah A. Small (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 30
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1 CitationsSource
#2Deborah A. Small (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 30
Last. Joseph P. Simmons (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 31
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Previous research suggests that choice causes an illusion of control-that it makes people feel more likely to achieve preferable outcomes, even when they are selecting among options that are functionally identical (e.g., lottery tickets with an identical chance of winning). This research has been widely accepted as evidence that choice can have significant welfare effects, even when it confers no actual control. In this article, we report the results of 17 experiments that examined whether choic...
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#1Ike Silver (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 3
#2George E. Newman (Yale University)H-Index: 29
Last. Deborah A. Small (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 30
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3 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
#2Ashwani MongaH-Index: 10
Last. Deborah A. SmallH-Index: 30
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Technological innovations are creating new products, services, and markets that satisfy enduring consumer needs. These technological innovations create value for consumers and firms in many ways, b...
11 CitationsSource
#1Sydney E. Scott (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 9
#2Paul Rozin (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 109
Last. Deborah A. Small (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 30
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6 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Z. Berman (LBS: London Business School)H-Index: 8
#2Amit Bhattacharjee (Ad: INSEAD)H-Index: 8
Last. Gal Zauberman (Yale University)H-Index: 33
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Abstract Who is expected to donate to charity, and how much should they give? Intuitively, the less financially constrained someone is the more they should give. How then do people evaluate who is constrained and who has money to spare? We argue that perceptions of spare money are reference-dependent with respect to one’s current self: those who earn more than oneself are perceived as having an abundance of spare money and thus as ethically obligated to donate. However, those higher earners them...
2 CitationsSource
#1Joshua Lewis (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 6
#2Deborah A. SmallH-Index: 30
Despite well-meaning intentions, people rarely allocate their charitable donations in the most cost-effective way possible. The manner in which cost-effectiveness information is presented can be a contributing factor. In four studies (N = 2,725), when we inform participants of the cost of a unit of impact (e.g. the cost of a mosquito net), they perversely donate less when the cost is cheaper. This result arises because people want their donation to have a tangible impact, and when the cost of su...
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#1Emma Levine (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 10
#2Alixandra Barasch (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 11
Last. Deborah A. Small (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 30
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We explore the signal value of emotion and reason in human cooperation. Across four experiments utilizing dyadic prisoner dilemma games, we establish three central results. First, individuals infer prosocial feelings and motivations from signals of emotion. As a result, individuals believe that a reliance on emotion signals that one will cooperate more so than a reliance on reason. Second, these beliefs are generally accurate—those who act based on emotion are more likely to cooperate than those...
41 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Z. Berman (LBS: London Business School)H-Index: 8
#2Deborah A. Small (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 30
Abstract What does it mean to act virtuously? We examine lay perceptions of virtue, and show that different psychological drivers of virtuous behavior are relevant for different types of actions. When evaluating non-moral virtuous behavior, such as choosing to skip dessert, attributions of virtue depend on perceived willpower (i.e., the extent to which someone overcomes temptation in service of acting virtuous). In contrast, when evaluating moral virtuous behavior, such as choosing to be faithfu...
4 CitationsSource