Carol L. Esmark
Mississippi State University
Supply chainInternet privacyAdvertisingFeelingProduct (category theory)BusinessPsychologyEconomicsMarketingCognitionWork (electrical)ReactancePersonal spaceProcess managementPerceptionControl (management)EmbarrassmentLoyaltyProduction (economics)Service (business)Customer experienceAffect (psychology)Process (engineering)Social psychology
16Publications
9H-index
335Citations
Publications 16
Newest
#1Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
#2Stephanie M. Noble (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 22
This research fills a gap in the retailing literature regarding physical proximity while shopping. Most research in this area examines perceived crowding or social presence and largely ignores issues of distance. Using four studies we explore the impact of the physical proximity of an employee to a shopper. Contrary to common belief, we show that such encroachments can increase consumers’ acceptance feelings and their purchase intentions. We illustrate how these results are consistent with socia...
14 CitationsSource
#1Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
#2Stephanie M. Noble (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 22
Last. Michael Breazeale (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 13
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This research fills a gap in the retailing literature regarding the impact of shoppers’ perceptions of being watched while shopping for embarrassing products. Four studies consistently show that an employee watching a shopper can cause the shopper to either permanently or temporarily leave the shopping area as purchase intentions decrease. Reactance theory explains this relationship, which is mediated by consumers’ feelings of control over their own privacy. Essentially, when shoppers believe an...
12 CitationsSource
#1Christian Barney (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 1
#2Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
Last. Stacie F. Waites (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 2
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For the first time, online purchases have outnumbered purchases made in store (excluding groceries) with 51% of purchases being made through web channels. One reason shoppers make certain purchases online is to minimize the embarrassment of being seen with certain products (e.g., condoms, diet-related products, or plus-size clothing). While much research talks about the success of product differentiation, our research conversely shows that for embarrassing products, increasing product anonymity ...
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#1Jennifer L. Stevens (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 4
#2Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
Last. Na Young Lee (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 2
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As companies continue to utilize co-production (customer participation in product or service creation) strategies with consumers, academic researchers have expanded their study on issues related to co-production. However, research has been scant on the issue of control in such situations. The underlying belief in increasing customer participation and involvement is it increases customers’ perceived control, thereby enhancing their experience and outcomes; this belief creates the necessity for fu...
6 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer L. Stevens (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 4
#2Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
Last. Michael Breazeale (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 13
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The phenomenon of electronic word of mouth (eWOM) has been the focus of a substantial amount of research, with negative eWOM receiving a great deal of that attention. Compared to positive ratings, negative reviews elicit stronger feelings toward both the brand and its performance (Mizerski 1982). Indeed, research indicates that four out of five online consumers have changed their decision to purchase based on a negative online product review (Cone 2011). While sales effects directly attributable...
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#1Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
#2Stephanie M. Noble (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 22
Last. David A. Griffith (Lehigh University)H-Index: 44
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Companies are encouraging customers to participate in the process of creating and delivering their offering(s). In this strategy, not only do providers select a level of customer co-production, but also the level of customer control. This study examines the effects of control types (cognitive, behavioral, and decisional) and their interaction on customers’ affective responses in service operations with varying levels of co-production. An extensive two-study design, across two service contexts, t...
17 CitationsSource
#1Carol L. EsmarkH-Index: 9
#2Stephanie M. NobleH-Index: 22
Last. John E. BellH-Index: 17
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Purpose This paper aims to examine the impact of an open loyalty programme (anyone can join) versus a selective programme (requirements must be met) to show what types of loyalty programmes are most effective. In-group identification, gratitude, stage of relationship and visibility are additionally examined. Design/methodology/approach Two studies use experimental methodology to initially test the relationships. A third study uses survey and panel data. Findings Open programmes lead to more in-g...
8 CitationsSource
#1Erin Adamson Gillespie (Elon University)H-Index: 5
#2Katie Hybnerova (University of North Alabama)H-Index: 1
Last. Stephanie M. Noble (College of Business Administration)H-Index: 22
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While there has been extensive research on deception, extant literature has not examined how deception is processed solely from the customer's perspective. Extensive qualitative interviews were conducted and analyzed to inform the proposed framework. Cognitive dissonance theory and attribution theory are used to frame the process consumers go through when deception is perceived. When consumers perceive deceit, they will consider attribution before determining intentionality. Internal attribution...
9 CitationsSource
#1David M. Gligor (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 21
#2Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
Last. Ismail Gölgeci (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 12
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The field of international business (IB) is in need of more theory development. As such, the main focus of our manuscript was to provide guidance on how to build IB specific theory using grounded theory (GT). Moreover, we contribute to future theory development by identifying areas within IB where GT can be applied and the type of research issues that can be addressed using this methodology. Finally, we make a noteworthy contribution by discussing some of GT’s caveats and limitations, particular...
26 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer L. Stevens (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 4
#2Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
Last. Stephanie M. Noble (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 22
view all 3 authors...
Customer participation has become an important firm strategy (Bendapudi and Leone 2003; Vargo and Lusch 2004). Companies are designing their offering(s) to allow customers to participate to various degrees in the process of creating and delivering the offering(s). In this strategy, not only do providers select a level of customer co-production, but also the level of control available to customers. This study examines the effects of control types (cognitive, behavioral, and decisional) and their ...
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