Nancy R. Kressin
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Ambulatory careInternal medicineEthnic groupPublic healthDemographyOdds ratioPsychologyHealth carePhysical therapyHealth equityVeterans AffairsMEDLINEQuality of life (healthcare)PopulationOral healthFamily medicineClinical psychologyMedicineGerontologyRace (biology)Blood pressure
188Publications
48H-index
4,946Citations
Publications 187
Newest
#1Christine M. Gunn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 9
#2Ariel Maschke (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
Last. Tracy A. Battaglia (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 22
view all 7 authors...
Background. When stakeholders offer divergent input, it can be unclear how to prioritize information for decision aids (DAs) on mammography screening. Objectives. This analysis triangulates perspectives (breast cancer screening experts, primary care providers [PCPs], and patients with limited health literacy [LHL]) to understand areas of divergent and convergent input across stakeholder groups in developing a breast cancer screening DA for younger women with LHL. Design. A modified online Delphi...
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#1Amy Rubin (VA: United States Department of Veterans Affairs)
#2Nicholas A Livingston (VA: United States Department of Veterans Affairs)
Last. Steven R. Simon (VA: United States Department of Veterans Affairs)H-Index: 149
view all 9 authors...
BACKGROUND Alcohol screening and brief intervention have demonstrated efficacy but limited effectiveness and implementation in real-world primary care settings. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Relational Agent programmed to provide alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment. We hypothesized that participants in the experimental condition would report greater reductions in their drinking and higher rates of brief intervention and referrals to specia...
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#1Melanie T Chen (Tufts Medical Center)
#2Danielle M Krzyszczyk (Tufts Medical Center)H-Index: 1
Last. Karen M. Freund (Tufts Medical Center)H-Index: 51
view all 12 authors...
Racial/ethnic disparities in glycemic control-a key diabetes outcome measure-continue to widen, even though the overall prevalence of glycemic control in the US has improved. Health insurance coverage may be associated with improved glycemic control, but few studies examine effects during a period of policy change. We assessed changes in glycemic control by racial/ethnic groups following the Massachusetts Health Insurance Reform for patients at two urban safety-net academic health systems betwee...
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#1Nancy R. Kressin (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 48
#2Tracy A. Battaglia (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 22
Last. Christine M. Gunn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 9
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Objective Understanding whether states’ breast density notifications are associated with desired effects, or disparities, can inform federal policy. We examined self-reported receipt of personal breast density information, breast density discussions with providers, knowledge about density’s masking effect, and association with increased breast cancer risk by state legislation status and women’s sociodemographic characteristics. Methods Cross-sectional observational population-based tele...
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#1Christine M. Gunn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 2
#2Ariel Maschke (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
Last. Tracy A. Battaglia (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
Limited health literacy is a driver of cancer disparities and associated with less participation in medical decisions. Mammography screening decisions are an exemplar of where health literacy may impact decision-making and outcomes. To describe informational needs and shared decision-making (SDM) experiences among women ages 40–54 who have limited health literacy and primary care providers (PCPs). Qualitative, in-depth interviews explored experiences with mammography counseling and SDM. Women ag...
2 CitationsSource
#1Gemmae M. Fix (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 14
#2Eileen M. Dryden (Veterans Health Administration)
Last. Barbara G. Bokhour (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 1
view all 6 authors...
Background Patients’ life contexts are increasingly recognized as important, as evidenced by growing attention to the Social Determinants of Health (SDoH). This attention may be particularly valuable for patients with complex needs, like those with HIV, who are more likely to experience age-related comorbidities, mental health or substance use issues. Understanding patient perceptions of their life context can advance SDoH approaches. Objectives We sought to understand how aging patients with HI...
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#1Alison G M Brown (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 3
Last. Karen M. Freund (Tufts Medical Center)H-Index: 51
view all 11 authors...
Objective: This study examined whether health insurance stability was associated with improved type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) control and reduced racial/ethnic health disparities. Methods: We utilized electronic medical record data (2005-2013) from two large, urban academic health systems with a racially/ethnically diverse patient popula­tion to examine insurance coverage, and three DM outcomes (poor diabetes control, A1c ≥8.0%; very poor diabetes control A1c >9.0%; and poor BP control, ≥ 130/80 ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Juliette McClendon (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 2
#1Juliette McClendon (VA Boston Healthcare System)
Last. Dawne Vogt (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 46
view all 6 authors...
Given the diversity of military veterans and growing evidence of ethnoracial disparities in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within this population, elucidating the role of discrimination-related stress in contributing to these disparities is crucial. We examined the relative impact of discriminatory stress (i.e., due to race/ethnicity, religion, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, or physical appearance) on 6-month changes in PTSD symptom severity among trauma-exposed White (74%), Blac...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ariel Maschke (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
#2Michael K. Paasche-Orlow (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 60
Last. Christine M. Gunn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 9
view all 6 authors...
Starting breast cancer screening at age 40 versus 50 may increase potential harms frequency with a small mortality benefit. Younger women's screening decisions, therefore, may be complex. Shared decision-making (SDM) is recommended for women under 50 and may support women under 55 for whom guidelines vary. How women with limited health literacy (LHL) approach breast cancer screening decision-making is less understood, and most SDM tools are not designed with their input. This phenomenological st...
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