Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić
University of Zagreb
AdvertisingPhysicsSociologyBusinessEssentialismHumanitiesPsychologyContent analysisMarketingPolitical sciencePresidential systemPosition (finance)NewspaperPerceptionGender equalityPublic relationsDemographic economicsSample (statistics)Product (business)ReputationMarketing researchSocial mediaInternal communicationsPolitics
46Publications
4H-index
76Citations
Publications 46
Newest
#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
This chapter discusses four specific areas of gender segregation—segregation in politics, segregation in entrepreneurship, segregation in STEM and segregation in communist and post-communist economies. While in the first three areas, although significant improvements are evident, we continue to encounter lower participation and engagement by women because of the many barriers imposed upon them, a communist ideology (either from the past for post-communist countries or still present for contempor...
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#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
The chapter discusses six main areas of gender segregation—essentialist segregation, educational segregation, employment segregation, occupational segregation, hierarchical segregation and pay segregation. Various types of gender segregation coexist and are highly correlated, exhibiting the spillover effect. Therefore, this chapter details numerous elements of each type of segregation, such as biological differences between genders; supply and demand side of gender essentialism; gender roles soc...
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Last. Ana Tkalac VerčičH-Index: 12
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1 Citations
#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
In this chapter, the results of primary research conducted on a sample of highly educated women from different educational areas, occupational groups, industries and countries, and with diverse demographic characteristics, are presented. The results show that, for highly educated women, the major issues in career development are related to difficulties in balancing between their personal and business life; therefore, improved organisational policies that enable an effective work-life balance, as...
Source
#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
The book concludes that essentialist, educational, employment, occupational, hierarchical and pay gender segregation are still apparent in the twenty-first century. However, the circumstances are noticeably better for highly educated women. Not only previous findings, but also the macro- and micro-empirical data presented in the book, imply that highly educated women, because of their more advantaged starting position, can ‘have it all’—a successful career and a fulfilling home and family life.
Source
#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
This chapter discusses three groups of barriers that women are faced with when looking for employment, undergoing training and development and competing for horizontal or vertical promotions. The discussion outlines the social, organisational and personal obstacles to women’s career development. Apart from the traditional view of women’s roles in society and stereotypes about their competences, social obstacles persist, including the double burden, lack of affordable childcare, lack of gender qu...
2 CitationsSource
#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
This chapter defines five groups of inclusion initiatives for women, that is, society-, state-, organisational-, household- and individual-level initiatives. Society-level initiatives involve women’s platforms and events. State-level initiatives encompass various legislation, infrastructure and awareness-raising activities, such as antidiscrimination legislation, care infrastructure and promotion of equal division of unpaid domestic work. Organisational-level initiatives stem from gender equalit...
2 CitationsSource
#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
This chapter summarises previous findings about the essentialist, educational, employment, occupational, hierarchical and pay segregation of highly educated women. Compared to less-educated women, highly educated women are certainly in a much better position, but although they improved their position in relation to highly educated men, they still have not reached equality. The segregation is still noteworthy in the attainment of higher levels of tertiary education, the areas of study (underrepre...
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#1Ana Tkalac Verčič (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 12
#2Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
Abstract Reputation management requires coordination between internal understanding and external expectations ( Cornelissen, 2011 ). The focus of this study were external expectations of potential employees. The main goal of the study was to contribute to the understanding of corporate reputation and its connections with perceived corporate social responsibility and employer brands. All three concepts were investigated amongst 550 senior college business students. The units of analysis were top ...
23 CitationsSource