Noor Asyikin Sahat
National Institutes of Health
QRS complexInternal medicineSurgeryLead (electronics)CardiologyCardiac resynchronization therapyCatheter ablationVentricular tachycardiaVerapamilPhrenic nerveRadiofrequency ablationHeart failureCoronary sinusAtrial flutterAblationVentricleAtrial tachycardiaVentricular remodelingTricuspid valveElectrocardiographyNarrow QRS complexLong Term Adverse EffectsPercutaneous approachLead PlacementSeverity of illnessPermanent pacemakerIn patientLeft sidedActive fixationNarrow qrsReverse remodelingTreatment outcomeSingle centreVentricular stimulationTerm (time)MedicineStroke volume
8Publications
1H-index
1Citations
Publications 8
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#1Lok Bin Yap (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 2
#2S T B Nguyen (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
Last. Razali Omar (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 15
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Introduction There are few registries for narrow QRSd ≤ 120 ms patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). We report longterm outcomes for patients with narrow QRSd ≤ 120 ms comp...
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#1Lok Bin Yap (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 2
#2Faisal Qadir (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 1
Last. Razali Omar (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 15
view all 16 authors...
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Introduction Permanent pacemaker implantations in patients requiring ventricular pacing is usually accomplished by the placement of endocardial pacing lead in the right ventricle. In the presence of prothestic tricuspid valve, this method has the potential of causing complications to the lead or the prosthetic valve and thus not recommended. Pacing options for this group of patients include epicardial lead implantation or the placement of lead in the coronary sinus. We describe the use of active...
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#1Ahmad Fazli Abdul Aziz (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
#2Azlan Hussin (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 7
Last. Razali Omar (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 15
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Introduction: Well positioned left sided lead implantation via the coronary venous system is central in ensuring delivery of resynchronization therapy in selected patients with heart failure. Unfortunately, many factors can negatively impact optimal positioning. Therefore, we investigated the safety and feasibility of using an active fixation lead in the distal branches of the coronary sinus for left ventricular stimulation. Methods: From May 2009 till May 2011 we replaced failed conventional le...
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