Kimberly L. Quinlan
Emory University
NeuropeptidePhosphorylationEndothelial stem cellInternal medicineDownregulation and upregulationSoluble cell adhesion moleculesResponse elementEndocrinologyFunction (biology)CellGene expressionMolecular biologyJAK-STAT signaling pathwayCell adhesion moleculeRegulation of gene expressionReceptorSTAT proteinTumor necrosis factor alphaCalcium in biologyChemistryNeuroimmunologyImmunologyTyrosineSubstance PInflammationVCAM-1EndotheliumSTAT1Human skinTyrosine phosphorylationDermisCytokineExtravasationWound healingNF-kappa B p50 SubunitIntercellular Adhesion Molecule-1NFATC Transcription FactorsPeptide hormoneSignal transductionInterleukin 8InterleukinPalindromic sequenceIntracellularAdhesionProtein tyrosine phosphataseCell adhesionTranscription factorBiologyDNA-binding proteinCell biology
7Publications
6H-index
444Citations
Publications 7
Newest
#1Kimberly L. Quinlan (Emory University)H-Index: 6
#2Shubhada M. Naik (Emory University)H-Index: 10
Last. S W Caughman (Emory University)H-Index: 7
view all 7 authors...
Upon stimulation, cutaneous sensory nerves release neuropeptides such as substance P (SP), which modulate responses in the skin by activating a number of target cells via neurokinin receptors. We have demonstrated that SP preferentially binds to the NK-1R on human dermal microvascular cells, resulting in increased intracellular Ca2+ and induction of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. In the current studies, we identify specific elements in the regulatory regions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 genes as necessar...
#1Kimberly L. Quinlan (Emory University)H-Index: 6
#2In Sung Song (Emory University)H-Index: 5
Last. John C. Ansel (Emory University)H-Index: 53
view all 9 authors...
Sensory nerves in skin are capable of releasing multiple neuropeptides, which modulate inflammatory responses by activating specific cutaneous target cells. Extravasation of particular subsets of leukocytes depends upon the regulated expression of cellular adhesion molecules such as VCAM-1 on microvascular endothelial cells. We examined the direct effect of cutaneous neuropeptides on the expression and function of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HDMEC) VCAM-1. A significant increase...
#1Kimberly L. Quinlan (Emory University)H-Index: 6
#2In Sung Song (Emory University)H-Index: 5
Last. John C. Ansel (Emory University)H-Index: 53
view all 10 authors...
There is increasing evidence that sensory nerves may participate in cutaneous inflammatory responses by the release of neuropeptides such as substance P (SP). We examined the direct effect of SP on...
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#1Jennifer L. Duff (Emory University)H-Index: 10
#2Kimberly L. Quinlan (Emory University)H-Index: 6
Last. S. Wright Caughman (Emory University)H-Index: 19
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Differential expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the epidermis plays a critical role in the regulation of cutaneous inflammation, immunologic reactions, and tissue repair. Transcriptional upregulation of ICAM-1 in response to interferon- γ (IFN γ ) occurs through a palindromic response element pI γ RE, pI γ RE is homologous to IFN γ -activated sequences, which bind to tyrosine phosphorylated members of the transcription factor family known as signal transducers and activa...
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#1Shubhada M. Naik (Emory University)H-Index: 10
#2Naotaka Shibagaki (Emory University)H-Index: 3
Last. S. Wright Caughman (Emory University)H-Index: 19
view all 6 authors...
Abstract In response to interferon γ (IFNγ), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is expressed on human keratinocytes, a cell type that is critically involved in cutaneous inflammation. An ICAM-1 5′ regulatory region palindromic response element, pIγRE, has been shown to confer IFNγ-dependent transcription enhancement. By electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), pIγRE forms a distinct complex with proteins from IFNγ-treated human keratinocytes, termed γ response factor (GRF). Binding ...
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#1John C. Ansel (Emory University)H-Index: 53
#2Cheryl A. Armstrong (Emory University)H-Index: 32
Last. Nigel W. Bunnett (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 104
view all 7 authors...
There is increasing experimental evidence that the neurologic system can directly participate in cutaneous inflammation and wound healing. Recent studies indicate that neuropeptides released by cutaneous nerves such as c-fibers can activate a number of target cells including keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, mast cells, and endothelial cells. One such neuropeptide, substance P (SP), is able to specifically bind to murine and human keratinocytes and induce the release of cytokines such as interleu...
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