Edward G. Lakatta
National Institutes of Health
Ryanodine receptorBiophysicsInternal medicineEndocrinologyEndoplasmic reticulumCardiologyChemistryDiastolic depolarizationMyocyteStimulationArterial stiffnessHeart rateHeart failureSinoatrial nodeCalciumDiastoleMedicineBlood pressureBiologyCell biology
1,025Publications
166H-index
77.5kCitations
Publications 1022
Newest
#1Mary S. Kim (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 4
#2Oliver Monfredi (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 19
Last. Victor A. Maltsev (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 50
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The heartbeat is initiated by pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node (SAN). SAN cells generate spontaneous action potentials (APs), i.e., normal automaticity. The sympathetic nervous system increases the heart rate commensurate with the cardiac output demand via stimulation of SAN β-adrenergic receptors (βAR). While SAN cells reportedly represent a highly heterogeneous cell population, the current dogma is that, in response to βAR stimulation, all cells increase their spontaneous AP fir...
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#1Tatiana M. Vinogradova (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 22
Last. Edward G. Lakatta (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 166
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The sinoatrial (SA) node is the physiological pacemaker of the heart, and resting heart rate in humans is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Consequently, the mechanisms of initiating and regulating the normal spontaneous SA node beating rate are of vital importance. Spontaneous firing of the SA node is generated within sinoatrial nodal cells (SANC), which is regulated by the coupled-clock pacemaker system. Normal spontaneous beating of SANC is driven by a high le...
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#1Jacopo Agrimi (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
#2Danilo Menicucci (UniPi: University of Pisa)H-Index: 19
Last. Nazareno Paolocci (JHUSOM: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)H-Index: 57
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Brain modulation of myocardial activity via the autonomic nervous system is increasingly well characterized. Conversely, how primary alterations in cardiac function, such as an intrinsic increase in heart rate or contractility, reverberate on brain signaling/adaptive behaviors - in a bottom-up modality - remains largely unclear. Mice with cardiac-selective overexpression of adenylyl cyclase type 8 (TGAC8) display increased heart rate and reduced heart rhythm complexity associated with a nearly a...
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#1Mary S. Kim (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 4
#2Oliver Monfredi (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 19
Last. Victor A. Maltsev (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 50
view all 5 authors...
The heartbeat is initiated by pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node (SAN). SAN cells generate spontaneous action potentials (APs), i.e. normal automaticity. The sympathetic nervous system increases heart rate commensurate with blood supply and cardiac output demand, known as the fight-or-flight response, via stimulation of SAN {beta}-adrenergic receptors ({beta}AR). It is classically believed that all cells increase their spontaneous AP firing rate in a similar fashion. In the present ...
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#1Jingwen Zhang (USF: University of South Florida)H-Index: 8
#2Zhibin He (USF: University of South Florida)H-Index: 3
Last. Mingyi Wang (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 28
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Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) and Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) protects cardiac function against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Mitochondria are critical in response to myocardial I/R injury as disturbance of mitochondrial dynamics contributes to cardiac dysfunction. It is hypothesized that SIRT1 and SIRT3 are critical components to maintaining mitochondria homeostasis especially mitochondrial dynamics to exert cardioprotective actions under I/R stress. The results demonstrated that deficiency of SIRT1 and SIRT3 in ...
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#1Samuel Ajamu (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
#2Rachel FennerH-Index: 2
Last. Kenneth W. FishbeinH-Index: 25
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Background Central arterial stiffness (CAS) is associated with elevated arterial blood pressure (BP) and is likely associated with stiffening of cerebral artery walls, with attendant cerebral hypoperfusion, neuronal density loss and cognitive decline. Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl-S) rats exhibit age-associated hypertension and memory loss, even on a normal salt intake.Method: We sought to explore whether central arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV), a marker of CAS, is associated with hippocampal cer...
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#1Dongmei YangH-Index: 28
Last. Edward G. LakattaH-Index: 166
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Ca2+ and Vm transitions occurring throughout AP cycles in sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cells are cues that: (1) not only regulate activation states of molecules operating within criticality (Ca2+ domain) and limit-cycle (Vm domain) mechanisms of a coupled-clock system that underlies SAN cell automaticity; (2) but are also regulated by the activation states of the clock molecules they regulate. In other terms, these cues are both causes and effects of clock molecular activation (recursion). Recently, w...
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#1Allen Sam Titus (Sree Chitra Thirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology)H-Index: 2
#2Harikrishnan Venugopal (Sree Chitra Thirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology)
Last. Shivakumar Kailasam (Sree Chitra Thirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology)H-Index: 3
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Fibronectin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein with a regulatory role in fundamental cellular processes. Recent reports on the cardioprotective effect of fibronectin inhibition in a setting of myocardial injury suggest a role for fibronectin in cardiac fibroblast function, which remains largely unexplored. This study probed the molecular basis and functional implications of fibronectin gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts exposed to Angiotensin II, a potent pro-fibrotic factor in the myoc...
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