James N. McDougal
Wright State University
GeneMessenger RNACytotoxicitySurgeryPathologyAbsorption (skin)Gene expressionMolecular biologyAndrologyJet fuelGene expression profilingChemistryMicroarrayIn vitroIrritationNitric oxide synthaseWound healingSulfur mustardToxicityDermal exposureDermal penetrationSkin irritationThermal injuryToxicologyChromatographySignal transductionMedicineJP-8Microarray analysis techniquesBiologyEpidermis (botany)DNA microarrayEC50
20Publications
14H-index
473Citations
Publications 19
Newest
#1James N. McDougal (Wright State University)H-Index: 14
#2Kenneth L. Jones (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 19
Last. Jeffrey W. Fisher (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 52
view all 7 authors...
Perchlorate (ClO4 −), which is a ubiquitous and persistent ion, competitively interferes with iodide (I) accumulation in the thyroid, producing I deficiency (ID), which may result in reduced thyroid hormone synthesis and secretion. Human studies suggest that ClO4 − presents little risk in healthy individuals; however, the precautionary principle demands that the sensitive populations of ID adults and mothers require extra consideration. In an attempt to determine whether the effects on gene expr...
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#1James V. Rogers (Battelle Memorial Institute)H-Index: 16
#2Jennifer A. Price (Battelle Memorial Institute)H-Index: 8
Last. James N. McDougal (Wright State University)H-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
Monitoring gene expression profiles in the skin using microarrays has become a useful approach to enhance the understanding of dermal function, toxicologic mechanisms, and risk assessment. With respect to cutaneous chemical exposure, there are few transcriptomic studies in the published literature, and these often differ in experimental design and availability of raw data. An assessment of multiple microarray data sets could be advantageous for identifying potential redundant biological mechanis...
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#1Jennifer A. Price (Battelle Memorial Institute)H-Index: 8
#2James V. Rogers (Battelle Memorial Institute)H-Index: 16
Last. John S. GrahamH-Index: 18
view all 6 authors...
Severe cutaneous injuries continue to result from exposure to sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide; HD] and thermal burns. Microarray analysis was utilized in this study to evaluate transcriptional changes in porcine skin assessing the underlying repair mechanisms of HD and thermal injury involved in wound healing. Four ventral abdominal sites on each of 4 weanling swine were exposed to 400 μL undiluted HD or a heated brass rod (70°C) for 8 minutes and 45–60 seconds, respectively. At 7 days...
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#1James V. Rogers (Battelle Memorial Institute)H-Index: 16
#2James N. McDougal (Wright State University)H-Index: 14
Last. John S. GrahamH-Index: 18
view all 5 authors...
In military and civilian environments, serious cutaneous damage can result from thermal burns or exposure to the blistering agent sulfur mustard [bis (2-chloroethyl) sulfide; HD]. Similar therapies have historically been used to treat cutaneous thermal and HD injuries; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms of tissue damage and wound healing may differ between the types of burns. Using microarray analysis, this study assessed the transcriptional responses to cutaneous HD and thermal injury...
Source
#1Jennifer A. Price (Battelle Memorial Institute)H-Index: 8
#2James V. Rogers (Battelle Memorial Institute)H-Index: 16
Last. John S. GrahamH-Index: 18
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Bromine is an industrial chemical that is irritating to the skin and causes cutaneous burns. An important factor in selecting or developing an effective treatment is to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms of tissue damage and wound healing. This study used a weanling swine burn model and microarray analysis to evaluate the effect of exposure length and sampling times on the transcriptional changes in response to cutaneous bromine injury. Ventral abdominal sites ( N = 4/treatm...
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#1James N. McDougal (Wright State University)H-Index: 14
#2Richard Simman (Wright State University)H-Index: 15
Last. Carol M. Garrett (Wright State University)H-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
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#1William J. Fasano (DuPont)H-Index: 11
#2James N. McDougal (Wright State University)H-Index: 14
Abstract In 2004, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published a final test rule in the US Federal Register requiring in vitro dermal penetration rate testing for selected industrial chemicals. The test rule described procedures for determining a permeability coefficient (Kp) and two short-term dermal absorption rates at 10 and 60 min using human cadaver skin mounted in an in vitro diffusion cell model. According to the USEPA announcement, the selected chemicals were to be...
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#1James N. McDougal (Wright State University)H-Index: 14
#2Carol M. Garrett (Wright State University)H-Index: 3
Exposures of jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) to human and laboratory animal skin have resulted in skin irritation. JP-8 is a mixture of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which in some cases have also been shown to be irritating to the skin. In an attempt to determine if aromatic or aliphatic components could mimic the JP-8-induced gene expression response, we exposed rats to JP-8, undecane (UND), tetradecane (TET), trimethylbenzene (TMB), and dimethylnaphthalene (DMN) for 1 h and examined the ep...
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#1H. Frederick Frasch (NIOSH: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)H-Index: 17
#2Ana M. Barbero (NIOSH: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)H-Index: 14
Last. James N. McDougal (Wright State University)H-Index: 14
view all 4 authors...
Cutaneous exposures to occupational chemicals may cause toxic effects. For any chemical, the potential for systemic toxicity from dermal exposure depends on its ability to penetrate the skin. Most laboratory studies measure chemical penetration from an aqueous solution through isolated human or laboratory animal skin, although most exposures are not from pure aqueous solutions. The US EPA Interagency Testing Committee (ITC) mandated by the Toxic Substances Control Act, has required industry to m...
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#1Darryl P. ArfstenH-Index: 6
#2Carol M. Garrett (Wright State University)H-Index: 3
Last. James N. McDougal (Wright State University)H-Index: 14
view all 5 authors...
Break-Free CLP is a commercial petroleum-based liquid used for cleaning, lubricating, and protecting firearms that is used in the United States by military personnel, police, and individual gun owners for maintaining a wide variety of firearms. According to its material safety data sheet (MSDS), Break-Free CLP is predominately polyalphaolefin oil but also contains dibasic ester and isoparaffinic hydrocarbons; all of these ingredients are known to induce skin irritation in laboratory animals. Stu...
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