Jessica L. McManus
Carroll College
Ingroups and outgroupsTest validityDiscriminant validityConvergent validityCultural diversityDevelopmental psychologyRacismSociologySocial psychology (sociology)PsychologyInterpersonal communicationNatural disasterPsychometricsSelfSocial groupVulnerabilityCompetence (law)MoralityPerspective (graphical)PerceptionPsychological interventionIntergroup anxietySelf-conceptSexual violenceCheatingSanctionsAversive racismIdentification (psychology)Scale (ratio)MasculinityHonorAggressionQuality (business)Quality of life (healthcare)Intervention (counseling)Alcohol abuseHostilityPolitical ConservatismSocial desirabilityMoral behaviorSocial consequenceActive engagementMoral identityIndividual differenceHurricane katrinaEffective interventionsPrejudiceSocial controlAffect (psychology)Public relationsRomanceNational securityIntellectual disabilityWhite (horse)Clinical psychologyCriminologySocial psychologyDominance (ethology)Incremental validity
15Publications
5H-index
179Citations
Publications 15
Newest
#1Jessica L. McManus (Carroll College)H-Index: 5
#2Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
Last. Jane E. Reid (Carroll College)
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Abstract Children’s biases toward their peers with intellectual disabilities tend to have negative developmental and social consequences for those with intellectual disabilities. As a result, researchers developed intervention programs to reduce biases toward children with intellectual disabilities. This meta-analysis is a quantitative summary of 59 studies and 144 hypothesis tests involving intervention programs to change children’s attitudes toward their peers with intellectual disabilities. R...
Source
#1Tammy L. Sonnentag (Xavier University)H-Index: 3
#2Jessica L. McManus (Carroll College)H-Index: 5
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
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ABSTRACTWhen morality is important and central to individuals’ identities (moral identity), it may heighten their sense of responsibility to behave in moral ways. Although research has linked moral...
3 CitationsSource
#1Jessica L. McManus (Carroll College)H-Index: 5
#2Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
Last. Donte L. Bernard (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 7
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AbstractWe examined aversive affect and racism as predictors of differences in helping White versus Black targets. According to aversive racism theory, Whites may express egalitarian attitudes but ...
1 CitationsSource
Last. Jessica L. McManusH-Index: 5
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#1Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
#2Russell J. WebsterH-Index: 10
Last. Megan L. Strain (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 8
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14 CitationsSource
#1Donald A. SaucierH-Index: 20
#2Amanda J. StanfordH-Index: 1
Last. Mason D. BurnsH-Index: 5
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1 CitationsSource
#1Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
#2Amanda J. Stanford (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 1
Last. Mason D. Burns (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 5
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Abstract Masculine honor, particularly as defined by the Southern culture of honor, centers on the belief that aggression is sometimes justifiable and necessary, such as in response to insult or threat. While masculine honor has been examined in terms of cultural differences, it has been less often examined in terms of individual differences. We developed a measure of masculine honor beliefs (MHBS) inspired by research on the Southern culture of honor. Four studies showed that the MHBS demonstra...
29 CitationsSource
#1Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
#2Megan L. Strain (UNK: University of Nebraska at Kearney)H-Index: 8
Last. Jessica L. McManus (Carroll College)H-Index: 5
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Abstract. Masculine honor consists of stereotypic beliefs about male behavior, including the belief that men’s aggression is appropriate, justifiable, and necessary in response to provocation, especially provocation that insults or threatens one’s manhood, family, or romantic partner. We conducted two studies examining the relationships between stereotypic masculine honor beliefs and perceptions of rape. Masculine honor beliefs generally were associated with both negative attitudes toward rape a...
18 CitationsSource
#1Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
#2Jessica L. McManus (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 5
The experience of masculinity includes many expectations for what it means to be a man. Research has demonstrated that men raised in the American South incorporate into their identities the beliefs that provocation requires an aggressive response so that they may solidify their masculinity and reduce their future vulnerability to transgressions. We contend that while there are cultural differences in the extent to which men embrace honor as key to their masculinity, there is variability among me...
15 CitationsSource
2 CitationsSource