Mark Collard
Simon Fraser University
Radiocarbon datingAnatomySociologyPaleontologyArchaeologyEcologyAnthropologyPhylogenetic treeSociocultural evolutionGeographyCladisticsEthnologyPopulationCultural transmission in animalsGenealogyEvolutionary biologyBiologyPhylogeneticsZoologyProjectile pointHistory
232Publications
50H-index
6,381Citations
Publications 200
Newest
#1Ashot Margaryan (UCPH: University of Copenhagen)H-Index: 17
#2Daniel J. Lawson (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 27
Last. Eske WillerslevH-Index: 123
view all 90 authors...
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#1W. Christopher Carleton (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 5
#2Dave Campbell (Carleton University)
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 50
view all 3 authors...
Recently, there has been a lot of discussion about the impact of climate change on human conflict. Here, we report a study in which we revisited the findings of a paper that has been cited many times in the discussion. The paper in question focused on the association between temperature and conflict in Europe between 1000 and 1980 CE and suggested that colder temperatures led to more conflict. However, there are reasons to be skeptical of this finding. Most importantly, the analytical technique ...
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#1Sally Wasef (Griffith University)H-Index: 6
#2Gabriel D. Wrobel (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 8
Last. Michael C. Westaway (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 14
view all 9 authors...
Abstract It has long been accepted that the Indigenous groups of Australia's Cape York Peninsula have numerous cultural traits that were adopted from people in New Guinea and/or the Torres Strait Islands after the formation of the Torres Strait around 8000 years ago. However, opinions differ on whether the movement of the traits in question was accompanied by gene flow events. Some argue for a significant amount of gene flow resulting from voyages from New Guinea and the Torres Strait Islands do...
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#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Hildur GestsdóttirH-Index: 10
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 50
view all 5 authors...
The settlement of Iceland in the Viking Age has been the focus of much research, but the composition of the founding population remains the subject of debate. Some lines of evidence suggest that almost all the founding population were Scandinavian, while others indicate a mix of Scandinavians and people of Scottish and Irish ancestry. To explore this issue further, we used three-dimensional techniques to compare the basicrania of skeletons from archaeological sites in Iceland, Scandinavia, and t...
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#1Brea McCauleyH-Index: 2
#2Mark CollardH-Index: 50
Last. Dennis SandgatheH-Index: 22
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The ability to control fire clearly had a significant impact on human evolution, but when and how hominins developed this ability remains poorly understood. Improving our understanding of the history of hominin fire use will require not only additional fieldwork but also comparative analyses of fire use by ethnographically-documented hunter-gatherer groups. Here, we report a study that focused on the second of these tasks. In the study, we consulted ethnographic texts for a sample of 93 hunter-g...
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#1Shaun Adams (Griffith University)H-Index: 4
#2Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 50
Last. Michael C. Westaway (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 14
view all 6 authors...
Bioarchaeological research in Australia has lagged behind that in other regions due to understandable concerns arising from the disregard of Indigenous Australians rights over their ancestors’ remains. To improve this situation, bioarchaeologists working in Australia need to employ more community-oriented approaches to research. This paper reports a project in which we employed such an approach. The project focused on burials in the Flinders Group, Queensland. Traditional Owners played a key rol...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ashot Margaryan (UCPH: University of Copenhagen)H-Index: 17
#2Daniel J. Lawson (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 27
Last. Eske WillerslevH-Index: 123
view all 90 authors...
The maritime expansion of Scandinavian populations during the Viking Age (about AD 750-1050) was a far-flung transformation in world history1,2. Here we sequenced the genomes of 442 humans from archaeological sites across Europe and Greenland (to a median depth of about 1×) to understand the global influence of this expansion. We find the Viking period involved gene flow into Scandinavia from the south and east. We observe genetic structure within Scandinavia, with diversity hotspots in the sout...
16 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Keith Dobney (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 49
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 50
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Background and objectives: The study reported here focused on the aetiology of spondylolysis, a vertebral pathology usually caused by a fatigue fracture. The goal was to test the Overshoot Hypothesis, which proposes that people develop spondylolysis because their vertebral shape is at the highly derived end of the range of variation within Homo sapiens. Methodology: We recorded 3D data on the final lumbar vertebrae of H. sapiens and three great ape species, and performed three analyses. First, w...
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#1W. Christopher Carleton (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 5
#2Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 50
ABSTRACTWe report a study in which we systematically reviewed the recent literature dealing with human-environment interaction in prehistory. We first identified the 165 most highly cited papers pu...
10 CitationsSource
#1Luseadra McKerracher (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 6
#2Pablo A. Nepomnaschy (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 12
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 50
view all 5 authors...
Variation in the durations of exclusive breastfeeding (exBF) and any breastfeeding (anyBF) is associated with socioecological factors. This plasticity in breastfeeding behavior appears adaptive, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. With this concept in mind, we investigated whether durations of exBF and anyBF in a rural Maya population covary with markers of a form of socioecological change—market integration—and whether individual factors (individual learning, physiological plasticity) and/...
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