Colleen E. Giblin
Carnegie Mellon University
RecallEndowment effectPhysicsFeelingPolarization (politics)AttributionOutcome (game theory)PsychologyCognitionMicroeconomicsCognitive psychologyValuation (finance)Economic impact analysisCondensed matter physicsDeliberationSelf-conceptLoss aversionChoseEveryday lifeMind-wanderingDecision strategyMemory biasRomanceChildhood memorySocial psychology
4Publications
3H-index
133Citations
Publications 4
Newest
#1Carey K. Morewedge (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 27
#2Colleen E. Giblin (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 3
The endowment effect is the tendency for people who own a good to value it more than people who do not. Its economic impact is consequential. It creates market inefficiencies and irregularities in valuation such as differences between buyers and sellers, reluctance to trade, and mere ownership effects. Traditionally, the endowment effect has been attributed to loss aversion causing sellers of a good to value it more than buyers. New theories and findings – some inconsistent with loss aversion – ...
97 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. Morewedge (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 27
#2Colleen E. Giblin (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 3
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 71
view all 3 authors...
Spontaneous thoughts, the output of a broad category of uncontrolled and inaccessible higher order mental processes, arise frequently in everyday life. The seeming randomness by which spontaneous thoughts arise might give people good reason to dismiss them as meaningless. We suggest that it is precisely the lack of control over and access to the processes by which they arise that leads people to perceive spontaneous thoughts as revealing meaningful self-insight. Consequently, spontaneous thought...
26 CitationsSource
#1Colleen E. Giblin (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 3
#2Carey K. Morewedge (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 27
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 71
view all 3 authors...
The mind wanders, even when people are attempting to make complex decisions. We suggest that such mind wandering—allowing one’s thoughts to wander until the “correct” choice comes to mind—can positively impact people’s feelings about their decisions. We compare post-choice satisfaction from choices made by mind wandering to reason-based choices and randomly assigned outcomes. Participants chose a poster by mind wandering or deliberating—or were randomly assigned a poster. Whereas forecasters pre...
3 CitationsSource