Eric D. Knowles
New York University
Ingroups and outgroupsSocial classFeelingEthnic groupDevelopmental psychologyRacismAttributionSociologyPsychologyIdeologyPolitical scienceConstrual level theoryPerceptionSelf-conceptAffirmative actionIdentity (social science)White privilegeOpposition (politics)DistancingPrejudiceOutgroupWhite (horse)Social psychologySocial cognitionPoliticsSocial identity theory
64Publications
26H-index
1,877Citations
Publications 62
Newest
#1Eric D. KnowlesH-Index: 26
#2Linda R. Tropp (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 44
Last. Mao Mogami (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 1
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White Americans may find diversity threatening in part because they construe non-White Americans as a coherent social and political force. We argue that this perception manifests in a belief that m...
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#1Shahrzad GoudarziH-Index: 2
#2Vivienne BadaanH-Index: 7
Last. Eric D. KnowlesH-Index: 26
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#1Eric D. KnowlesH-Index: 26
#2Monica McDermottH-Index: 8
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#1Sarah H. DiMuccio (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 2
#2Eric D. Knowles (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 26
Precarious manhood (PM) theory posits that males are expected to actively maintain their reputations as “real men.” We propose that men’s concern about failing to meet masculine standards leads the...
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#1Pia Dietze (UCI: University of California, Irvine)H-Index: 4
#2Eric D. Knowles (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 26
Theory of Mind" (ToM; people's ability to infer and use information about others' mental states) varies across cultures. In four studies (N = 881), including two preregistered replications, we show that social class predicts performance on ToM tasks. In Studies 1A and 1B, we provide new evidence for a relationship between social class and emotion perception: Higher-class individuals performed more poorly than their lower-class counterparts on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test, which has part...
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#1Alice Lucarini (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 1
#2Caterina Suitner (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 12
Last. Bruno Gabriel Salvador Casara (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 2
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Abstract Since 2017, the year in which the #MeToo movement burst into the spotlight, many women voiced their experiences with sexual predation. Although many people support the movement, others have questioned the credibility of women who report sexual harassment, particularly if they report their experience a long time after it occurred. The present study tackles two questions. First, is there a difference in people's reactions to harassed women depending on when they report the harassment? Sec...
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#1Sarah H. DiMuccio (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 2
#2Eric D. Knowles (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 26
Recent research in gender psychology finds that males are expected to actively earn and maintain their status as ‘real men’ or risk losing this valued group status. The precariousness of manhood can create anxiety among males who feel that they are failing to meet cultural standards of masculinity—a state we term fragile masculinity. Although research has identified a variety of strategies that men adopt in order to restore their threatened status as ‘real men’, few studies have examined compens...
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#1Anton Gollwitzer (Yale University)H-Index: 8
#2Cameron Martel (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 5
Last. Jay J. Van Bavel (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 42
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Few things bind disparate groups together like a common obstacle. Yet, numerous polls suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic has been subject to a deep partisan divide. Using geo-tracking data of over 17 million smartphone users around the United States, we examined whether partisan differences predict objective physical-distancing behaviors. U.S. counties that voted for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton in 2016 exhibited 16% less physical distancing from March 9 to May 8, 2020, as assessed by overa...
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#1Anton Gollwitzer (Yale University)H-Index: 8
#2Cameron Martel (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 5
Last. Jay J. Van Bavel (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 42
view all 7 authors...
Numerous polls suggest that COVID-19 is a profoundly partisan issue in the United States. Using the geotracking data of 15 million smartphones per day, we found that US counties that voted for Donald Trump (Republican) over Hillary Clinton (Democrat) in the 2016 presidential election exhibited 14% less physical distancing between March and May 2020. Partisanship was more strongly associated with physical distancing than numerous other factors, including counties' COVID-19 cases, population densi...
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#1Shahrzad Goudarzi (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 2
#2Ruthie Pliskin (LEI: Leiden University)H-Index: 11
Last. Eric D. Knowles (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 26
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Although humans display inequality aversion, many people appear to be untroubled by widespread economic disparities. We suggest that such indifference is partly attributable to a belief in the fairness of the capitalist system. Here we report six studies showing that economic ideology predicts self-reported and physiological responses to inequality. In Studies 1 and 2, participants who regard the economic system as justified, compared with those who do not, report feeling less negative emotion a...
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