Victor Kuperman
McMaster University
Valence (psychology)Lexical decision taskWord recognitionEye movementArtificial intelligencePsychologyMorphemeWord lists by frequencyCognitive psychologyNatural language processingCompoundSentenceVocabularySpellingWord processingComputer scienceLinguisticsComprehensionReading (process)Psycholinguistics
80Publications
23H-index
3,837Citations
Publications 78
Newest
This cross-linguistic study investigated the impact of spelling errors on reading behavior in five languages (Chinese, English, Finnish, Greek, and Hebrew). Learning theories predict that correct and incorrect spelling alternatives (e.g., "tomorrow" and "tommorrow") provide competing cues to the sound and meaning of a word: The closer the alternatives are to each other in their frequency of occurrence, the more uncertain the reader is regarding the spelling of that word. An information-theoretic...
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#1Sean Patrick McCarron (University of Oxford)
#2Victor Kuperman (McMaster University)H-Index: 23
Studies of reading have shown the "Matthew effect" of exposure to print on reading skill: poor readers avoid reading, and ability develops more slowly compared to peers, while good readers improve more quickly through increased exposure. Yet it is difficult to determine just how much an individual reads. The Author Recognition Test (ART, Stanovich & West Reading Research Quarterly, 24(4), 402-433, 1989) and its multilingual adaptations are often used for quantifying exposure to print and have sh...
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Emotions play a fundamental role in language learning, use, and processing. Words denoting positivity account for a larger part of the lexicon than words denoting negativity, and they also tend to be used more frequently, a phenomenon known as positivity bias. However, language experience changes over an individual's lifetime, making the examination of the emotion-laden lexicon an important topic not only across the life span but also across languages. Furthermore, existing theories predict a ra...
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#1Aki-Juhani Kyröläinen (McMaster University)H-Index: 3
#2Victor Kuperman (McMaster University)H-Index: 23
What makes a literate person? What leads to literacy gains and losses within and between individuals and countries? This paper provides new evidence that helps answer these questions. The present comparative analysis of literacy is based on large representative samples from the Survey of Adult Skills conducted in 33 countries, with 25-65 year old participants. We provide, for the first time, estimates of relative importance for a comprehensive set of experiential factors, motivations, incentives...
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#1Marc Brysbaert (UGent: Ghent University)H-Index: 86
#2Zsuzsa Bakk (LEI: Leiden University)H-Index: 9
Last. Melvin J. Yap (NUS: National University of Singapore)H-Index: 28
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#1Daniel Schmidtke (McMaster University)H-Index: 7
#2Julie A. Van Dyke (Haskins Laboratories)H-Index: 19
Last. Victor Kuperman (McMaster University)H-Index: 23
view all 3 authors...
The CompLex database presents a large-scale collection of eye-movement studies on English compound-word processing. A combined total of 440 participants completed eye-tracking experiments in which they silently read unspaced English compound words (e.g., goalpost) embedded in sentence contexts (e.g., Dylan hit the goalpost when he was aiming for the net.). Three studies were conducted using participants representing the non-college-bound population (300 participants), and four studies included p...
1 CitationsSource
#1Bryor Snefjella (McMaster University)H-Index: 3
#2Nadia Lana (McMaster University)H-Index: 1
Last. Victor Kuperman (McMaster University)H-Index: 23
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Abstract The present paper addresses two under-studied dimensions of novel word learning. We ask (a) whether originally meaningless novel words can acquire emotional connotations from their linguistic contexts, and (b) whether these acquired connotations can affect the quality of orthographic and semantic word learning and its retention over time. In five experiments using three stimuli sets, L1 speakers of English learned nine novel words embedded in contexts that were consistently positive, ne...
1 CitationsSource
#1Victor Kuperman (McMaster University)H-Index: 23
#2Avital Deutsch (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 19
Hebrew noun-noun compounds offer a valuable opportunity to study the long-standing question of how morphologically complex words are processed during reading. Specifically, in some morpho-syntactic environments, the first (head) noun of a compound carries a suffix-a clear orthographic marker of being part of a compound-whereas in others it is homographic with a stand-alone noun. In addition to this morphological cue, Hebrew occasionally employs hyphenation as a visual signal that two nouns, whic...
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Most English compounds are spaced compounds, whereas spelling regulations prescribe Finnish compounds to be written in a concatenated format. However, as in English, Finnish compounds are commonly spaced nowadays (e.g., piha juhla ‘garden party’), a phenomenon that we labeled the ‘English disease’. In this eye movement study with Finnish–English bilinguals we investigate whether the reading of a concatenated or illegally spaced Finnish compound is affected by the spelling of an English translati...
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#1Daniel SchmidtkeH-Index: 7
#2Victor KupermanH-Index: 23
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