Richard P. Larrick
Duke University
FeelingSocial perceptionBusinessOutcome (game theory)EconometricsPsychologyActuarial scienceEconomicsMarketingCognitionMicroeconomicsCognitive psychologyPersonalityNegotiationPerceptionChoice architecturePower (social and political)Advice (complexity)Task (project management)Public relationsComputer scienceProcess (engineering)Fuel efficiencySocial psychologySocial cognition
91Publications
37H-index
5,723Citations
Publications 87
Newest
#1Christina A. Rader (Duke University)H-Index: 2
#2Jack B. Soll (Duke University)H-Index: 18
Last. Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
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Five studies compare the effects of forming an independent judgment prior to receiving advice with the effects of receiving advice before forming one’s own opinion. We call these the independent-then-revise sequence and the dependent sequence, respectively. We found that dependent participants adjusted away from advice, leading to fewer estimates close to the advice compared to independent-then-revise participants (Studies 1–5). This “push-away” effect was mediated by confidence in the advice (S...
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#1Richard P. LarrickH-Index: 37
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#1Julia A. Minson (Harvard University)H-Index: 12
#2Jennifer Müller (USD: University of San Diego)H-Index: 1
Last. Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
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We evaluate the effect of discussion on the accuracy of collaborative judgments. In contrast to prior research, we show that discussion can either aid or impede accuracy relative to simple averaging of collaborators’ independent judgments, as a systematic function of task type and interaction process. On estimation tasks with a wide range of potential estimates, discussion aided accuracy by helping participants prevent and eliminate egregious errors. On estimation tasks with a naturally bounded ...
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#1Richard P. LarrickH-Index: 37
#2Jack B. SollH-Index: 18
Last. Ralph L. KeeneyH-Index: 71
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Consumers are often poorly informed about the energy consumed by different technologies and products. Traditionally, consumers have been provided with limited and flawed energy metrics, such as miles per gallon , to quantify energy use. We propose four principles for designing better energy metrics. Better measurements would describe the amount of energy consumed by a device or activity, not its energy efficiency; relate that information to important objectives , such as reducing costs or enviro...
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#1Karen Huang (Duke University)
Last. Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
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Individuals are constantly surrounded by a wide variety of different sources of advice, from paid professional advisors and board members to spouses and friends, and more recently social media and big data. Despite the massive amount of advice that is available, individuals frequently fail to capitalize on it to improve the quality of their decisions and outcomes. This symposium features four empirical papers that examine how individuals seek and take advice. First, Rachel Meng will discuss how ...
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#1Albert E. MannesH-Index: 7
#2Jack B. Soll (Duke University)H-Index: 18
Last. Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
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Social psychologists have long recognized the power of statisticized groups. When individual judgments about some fact (e.g., the unemployment rate for next quarter) are averaged together, the average opinion is typically more accurate than most of the individual estimates, a pattern often referred to as the wisdom of crowds. The accuracy of averaging also often exceeds that of the individual perceived as most knowledgeable in the group. However, neither averaging nor relying on a single judge i...
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#1Adrian R. Camilleri (Duke University)H-Index: 11
#2Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
Interest is increasing in using behavioral decision insights to design better product labels. A specific policy target is the fuel economy label, which policy makers can use to encourage reduction in carbon dioxide emissions from transport-related fossil-fuel combustion. In two online experiments, the authors examine whether vehicle preferences can be shifted toward more fuel-efficient vehicles by manipulating the metric (consumption of gas vs. cost of gas) and scale (100 miles vs. 15,000 miles ...
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#1J. Craig AndrewsH-Index: 2
#2Adrian R. CamilleriH-Index: 11
Last. Daniel M. LadikH-Index: 9
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#1Leigh Plunkett TostH-Index: 16
#2Francesca GinoH-Index: 79
Last. Richard P. LarrickH-Index: 37
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#1Leigh Plunkett Tost (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 16
#2Francesca Gino (Harvard University)H-Index: 79
Last. Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
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We examine the impact of subjective power on leadership behavior and demonstrate that the psychological effect of power on leaders spills over to impact team effectiveness. Specifically, drawing from the approach/inhibition theory of power, power-devaluation theory, and organizational research on the antecedents of employee voice, we argue that a leader's experience of heightened power produces verbal dominance, which reduces perceptions of leader openness and team open communication. Consequent...
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