Richard P. Larrick
Duke University
FeelingSocial perceptionBusinessOutcome (game theory)EconometricsPsychologyActuarial scienceEconomicsMarketingCognitionMicroeconomicsCognitive psychologyPersonalityNegotiationPerceptionChoice architecturePower (social and political)Advice (complexity)Task (project management)Public relationsComputer scienceProcess (engineering)Fuel efficiencySocial psychologySocial cognition
91Publications
37H-index
5,723Citations
Publications 86
Newest
#1Richard P. LarrickH-Index: 37
#2M. Asher LawsonH-Index: 1
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#1Sean Fath (Cornell University)H-Index: 2
#2Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
Last. Jack B. Soll (Duke University)H-Index: 17
view all 3 authors...
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#1Matthew Asher Lawson (Duke University)
#2Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
Last. Jack B. Soll (Duke University)H-Index: 17
view all 3 authors...
Research on judgment and decision making has suggested that the System 2 process of ‘thinking slow’ can help people to improve their decision making by reducing well-established statistical decisio...
1 CitationsSource
Seven experiments demonstrate that framing an organizational entity (the target) as an organization ("an organization comprised of its constituent members") versus its members ("constituent members comprising an organization") increases attribution of responsibility to the target following a negative outcome, despite identical information conveyed. Specifically, the target in the organization (vs. members) frame was perceived to have more control over a negative outcome, which led to an increase...
1 CitationsSource
#1M. Asher LawsonH-Index: 1
#2Richard P. LarrickH-Index: 37
Last. Jack B. SollH-Index: 17
view all 3 authors...
Research on judgment and decision making has suggested that the System 2 process of slow thinking can help people to improve their decision making by reducing well-established statistical decision biases (including base rate neglect, probability matching, and the conjunction fallacy). In a large pre-registered study with 1,706 participants and 23,292 unique observations, we compare the effects of individual differences and behavioral interventions to test the relative benefits of slow thinking o...
2 Citations
#1Hayley Blunden (Duke University)
#4Michael North (York University)
Last. Siyu Yu (York University)
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In navigating the complexities of work and life, people frequently turn to others for advice. Prior advice research has primarily focused on how advice seekers recruit and use the guidance they rec...
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#1Adrian R. Camilleri (UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)H-Index: 11
#2Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
: The authors investigated the effectiveness of aggregating over potential noncontingent collective action ("If X people all do Y action, then Z outcomes will be achieved") to increase prosocial behavior. They carried out 6 experiments encouraging 4 different prosocial activities and found that aggregating potential benefits over 1,000 people produced more prosocial intentions and actions than aggregating over 1 person did. The authors further showed that aggregating potential benefits over 1,00...
2 CitationsSource
#1Adrian R. Camilleri (UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)H-Index: 11
#2Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
Last. Dalia Patino Echeverri (Duke University)H-Index: 1
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Food production is a major cause of energy use and GHG emissions, and therefore diet change is an important behavioural strategy for reducing associated environmental impacts. However, a severe obstacle to diet change may be consumers’ underestimation of the environmental impacts of different types of food. Here we show that energy consumption and GHG emission estimates are significantly underestimated for foods, suggesting a possible blind spot suitable for intervention. In a second study, we f...
Source
#1Adrian R. Camilleri (UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)H-Index: 11
#2Richard P. Larrick (Duke University)H-Index: 37
Last. Dalia Patiño-Echeverri (Duke University)H-Index: 19
view all 4 authors...
Food production is a major cause of energy use and GHG emissions, and therefore diet change is an important behavioural strategy for reducing associated environmental impacts. However, a severe obstacle to diet change may be consumers’ underestimation of the environmental impacts of different types of food. Here we show that energy consumption and GHG emission estimates are significantly underestimated for foods, suggesting a possible blind spot suitable for intervention. In a second study, we f...
46 CitationsSource